At Last a Substitute to Hydroquinone!

If you are dealing with sunspots or melasma, you may be considering using a topical cream with the ingredient hydroquinone. Is it worth it? The short answer is not anymore! As you will find as you read this article, hydroquinone has serious side effects. If you are searching for how to get rid of hyperpigmentation, there is now a safer substitute to hydroquinone.

What is Hydroquinone used for?

Hydroquinone is an organic compound used for treating dark brownish spots on the skin. It is a common ingredient in topical creams used for treating hyperpigmentation, melasma, and age spots. According to WebMD, “this medicine works by blocking the process in the skin that leads to discoloration.”

Why is It Harmful?

While doctors have been prescribing topical creams containing hydroquinone to treat hyperpigmentation and melasma for years, it is now raising red flags. Some individuals had reactions to the medication. However, there are more alarming concerns.

When used incorrectly (or overused), it can actually cause the skin to darken to a bluish-black color. Additionally, in studies with rats, scientists noted an increased number of tumors in rats that were exposed to this ingredient. For this reason, the FDA in the United States has proposed a ban on the product. It is already banned in England and France.

What Should You Use Instead?

Fortunately, a new discovery has been made that offers a safe alternative for hydroquinone. Cysteamine Cream is made from Cysteamine, which is naturally in our bodies and is used to regulate melanin found in the skin. The ability to use Cysteamine to correct skin pigment issues is revolutionary.

Not only is Cysteamine Cream a safer alternative, it has been clinically proven to be more effective that hydroquinone. It is anticarcinogenic and much more potent for skin lightening. If you are seeking medical help for skin pigmentation issues, speak with your healthcare provider about using Cysteamine rather than hydroquinone.

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